In a corner of the Jalozai refugee camp near Peshawar, Pakistan, young girls learn to read and write in a segregated school. 2003
 

A small fraction of women in Pakistan are educated after generations of lack of emphasis on schooling. Some families opt to send their daughters to free religious schools, called madrassas, where the curriculum is heavily based on the Koran, often emphasizing memorization over reading, and where neither writing or arithmetic are taught. Through the support of tribal elders and the international community, more girls are attending school today.

 

Little girls play hop-scotch after school in the Khawa refugee camp outside of Peshawar, Pakistan. For the most part, boys and girls are kept separate from the time they are school age. 2001

 

A small fraction of women in Pakistan are educated after generations of lack of emphasis on schooling. Some families opt to send their daughters to free religious schools, called madrassas, where the curriculum is heavily based on the Koran, often emphasizing memorization over reading, and where neither writing or arithmetic are taught. Through the support of tribal elders and the international community, more girls are attending school today.

 

A little girl follows the lesson in her book in a RAWA (Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan) run school in the Khawa refugee camp outside of Peshawar, Pakistan. 2001

 

A small fraction of women in Pakistan are educated after generations of lack of emphasis on schooling. Some families opt to send their daughters to free religious schools, called madrassas, where the curriculum is heavily based on the Koran, often emphasizing memorization over reading, and where neither writing or arithmetic are taught. Through the support of tribal elders and the international community, more girls are attending school today.

 

School girls take a physics test outside their classroom in a RAWA (Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan) run school in the Khawa refugee camp outside of Peshawar, Pakistan. 2001

 

A small fraction of women in Pakistan are educated after generations of lack of emphasis on schooling. Some families opt to send their daughters to free religious schools, called madrassas, where the curriculum is heavily based on the Koran, often emphasizing memorization over reading, and where neither writing or arithmetic are taught. Through the support of tribal elders and the international community, more girls are attending school today.