Kneeling at the chalkboard in her coeducational third grade class in Kabul, Afghanistan, Wahid, whose real name is Wahida, was raised as a boy. Thus, she was allowed to help her father in his shop during the Taliban reign when no women were allowed to work. She is the family's eighth daughter. In the years immediately after the Taliban were deposed, she refused to relinquish her freedoms and conform to her culture's traditional role for women. 2003

 

Though historically Afghans have valued education, during the Taliban’s reign, girls were not allowed to attend school. In at least one case, a family dressed their youngest daughter as a boy so she could attend school, and could leave the confines of the family’s compound to help with chores outside of the house. In 2001, one of the first changes made by the Karzai government was to allow girls to attend school.

 

A three-year-old girl stands in a burka in a school yard in Kabul, Afghanistan. Among students at the school is Wahid, whose real name is Wahida, who was raised as a boy, and so allowed to help her father in his shop during the Taliban reign when no women were allowed to work. She is the family's eighth daughter. In the years immediately after the Taliban were deposed, she refused to relinquish her freedoms and conform to her culture's traditional role for women. 2003

 

Though historically Afghans have valued education, during the Taliban’s reign, girls were not allowed to attend school. In at least one case, a family dressed their youngest daughter as a boy so she could attend school, and could leave the confines of the family’s compound to help with chores outside of the house. In 2001, one of the first changes made by the Karzai government was to allow girls to attend school.

 

A teacher walks into a classroom at a school in Kabul, Afghanistan. Among its students is Wahid, real name Wahida, who was raised as a boy, and so allowed to help her father in his shop during the Taliban reign when no women were allowed to work. She is the family's eighth daughter. In the years immediately after the Taliban were deposed, she refused to relinquish her freedoms and conform to her culture's traditional role for women. 2003

 

Though historically Afghans have valued education, during the Taliban’s reign, girls were not allowed to attend school. In at least one case, a family dressed their youngest daughter as a boy so she could attend school, and could leave the confines of the family’s compound to help with chores outside of the house. In 2001, one of the first changes made by the Karzai government was to allow girls to attend school.

 

Nargas is a frequent visitor to the home of Wahid, whose real name is Wahida. As the eighth daughter, Wahida was raised as a boy and so allowed to help her father in his shop during the Taliban reign when no women were allowed to work. In the years immediately after the Taliban were deposed, she refused to relinquish her freedoms and conform to her culture's traditional role for women. 2003

 

Though historically Afghans have valued education, during the Taliban’s reign, girls were not allowed to attend school. In at least one case, a family dressed their youngest daughter as a boy so she could attend school, and could leave the confines of the family’s compound to help with chores outside of the house. In 2001, one of the first changes made by the Karzai government was to allow girls to attend school.